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book3-toc [2021/08/02 13:46]
127.0.0.1 external edit
book3-toc [2021/08/03 13:55] (current)
becker
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 The first part of the book explains what is meant by the term ‘gamification’, where it comes from, and what it is, and isn’t. The first part of the book explains what is meant by the term ‘gamification’, where it comes from, and what it is, and isn’t.
  
-===== CHAPTER 1. PRE-GAME =====+===== CH 1. Pre-Game =====
  
 As with many other terms in the field of video game studies, there is no standard definition for 'gamification', so it is necessary to explain for each context what is meant by the term. Many confuse the notion of gamification with the use of digital games for learning (Renaud & Wagoner, 2011) and although these two terms are related, they are not the same thing. Even though some resistance remains in formal education, the use of games for learning (digital game-based learning, or DGBL) is slowly beginning to enjoy mainstream acceptance as more research supporting the viability of games as a medium for learning becomes available (Tobias & Fletcher, 2012). Gamification does not yet have the same recognition. As with many other terms in the field of video game studies, there is no standard definition for 'gamification', so it is necessary to explain for each context what is meant by the term. Many confuse the notion of gamification with the use of digital games for learning (Renaud & Wagoner, 2011) and although these two terms are related, they are not the same thing. Even though some resistance remains in formal education, the use of games for learning (digital game-based learning, or DGBL) is slowly beginning to enjoy mainstream acceptance as more research supporting the viability of games as a medium for learning becomes available (Tobias & Fletcher, 2012). Gamification does not yet have the same recognition.
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   - References, Notes, Resources   - References, Notes, Resources
  
-===== CHAPTER 2THE GOODBADAND UGLY =====+===== CH2The Goodthe Badand the Ugly =====
  
 This chapter will show several examples of gamified spaces (foursquare, linkedin, researchgate, etc) as well as some examples of gamified educational spaces (khan academy, some MOOCs, etc). We will look at what's good and not so good about the sites in order to get a sense for ways that gamification can be used. This chapter will show several examples of gamified spaces (foursquare, linkedin, researchgate, etc) as well as some examples of gamified educational spaces (khan academy, some MOOCs, etc). We will look at what's good and not so good about the sites in order to get a sense for ways that gamification can be used.
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   - References, Notes, Resources   - References, Notes, Resources
  
-===== CHAPTER 3. GAMIFICATION IS NOT NEW =====+===== CH 3. Gamification is Not New =====
  
 Many of the techniques now being touted as gamification are not new at all. Even those aspects often criticized as being superficial have been used in various forms at various times to greater and lesser effect. Children in elementary school often get stickers for completed work; both the Boy Scouts and the Girl Guides (as well as a great many other organizations) use badges to symbolize various achievements, and of course, medals and badges have been a longstanding tradition in militaries throughout the world. The notion of leaderboards is also not unique to videogames, or games of any sort for that matter, as they can be found in many businesses as ways to highlight sales records for example, and in schools to commemorate a myriad of achievements academic and otherwise. If we consider the concept of levels in games, then certainly the grades (K-12) and years (freshman, junior, senior, sophomore) of formal education are the very embodiment of 'levels'. There are known requirements for completing one level and each new level opens up new content and additional options.  Many of the techniques now being touted as gamification are not new at all. Even those aspects often criticized as being superficial have been used in various forms at various times to greater and lesser effect. Children in elementary school often get stickers for completed work; both the Boy Scouts and the Girl Guides (as well as a great many other organizations) use badges to symbolize various achievements, and of course, medals and badges have been a longstanding tradition in militaries throughout the world. The notion of leaderboards is also not unique to videogames, or games of any sort for that matter, as they can be found in many businesses as ways to highlight sales records for example, and in schools to commemorate a myriad of achievements academic and otherwise. If we consider the concept of levels in games, then certainly the grades (K-12) and years (freshman, junior, senior, sophomore) of formal education are the very embodiment of 'levels'. There are known requirements for completing one level and each new level opens up new content and additional options. 
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   - References, Notes, Resources   - References, Notes, Resources
  
-===== CHAPTER 4. GAMIFICATION IS NEW =====+===== CH 4. Gamification **IS** New =====
  
 {{ :book:gamification-13.png?300|}} {{ :book:gamification-13.png?300|}}
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 The second part of the book provides practical explanations, tools, and techniques that educators can use to gamify anything from single lessons to entire programs. The second part of the book provides practical explanations, tools, and techniques that educators can use to gamify anything from single lessons to entire programs.
  
-===== CHAPTER 5. GAMIFYING YOUR CLASSROOM =====+===== CH 5. Gamifying Your Classroom =====
  
 This chapter provides an overview of how to gamify classrooms in the general sense. The usual cases where practical gamification can be incorporated into the classroom are described, and  common game mechanics are outlined along with how these can be incorporated into a classroom setting. It provides an overview of the gamification process, which will be covered in greater detail in the following chapters. This chapter provides an overview of how to gamify classrooms in the general sense. The usual cases where practical gamification can be incorporated into the classroom are described, and  common game mechanics are outlined along with how these can be incorporated into a classroom setting. It provides an overview of the gamification process, which will be covered in greater detail in the following chapters.
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   - References, Notes, Resources   - References, Notes, Resources
  
-===== CHAPTER 6. LEARNING PATH - The Beginning of Choice =====+===== CH 6. Learning Path - The Beginning of Choice =====
  
 The rapid advance of technological developments has prompted frequent calls for changes to how we teach. It's been said that today's 'digital natives' learn differently, that they are far more comfortable using technology than the rest of us. However, it is important to distinguish between proficiency of use, and understanding. There is in fact growing evidence that while today's learners may be quick to turn to their phones and the Internet, they do not necessarily know how to learn with these devices. Simply knowing how to read and write does not mean one will automatically be able to learn from books. The role of the teacher is not yet obsolete, but, what is clear is that classrooms need to change. One aspect of 21st century learning that has become prominent is the notion of personalization in learning, but even then the role of the teacher is not obsolete, instead the emphasis has shifted from being 'the sage on the stage' to 'the guide on the side' (King, 1993). The rapid advance of technological developments has prompted frequent calls for changes to how we teach. It's been said that today's 'digital natives' learn differently, that they are far more comfortable using technology than the rest of us. However, it is important to distinguish between proficiency of use, and understanding. There is in fact growing evidence that while today's learners may be quick to turn to their phones and the Internet, they do not necessarily know how to learn with these devices. Simply knowing how to read and write does not mean one will automatically be able to learn from books. The role of the teacher is not yet obsolete, but, what is clear is that classrooms need to change. One aspect of 21st century learning that has become prominent is the notion of personalization in learning, but even then the role of the teacher is not obsolete, instead the emphasis has shifted from being 'the sage on the stage' to 'the guide on the side' (King, 1993).
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   - References, Notes, Resources   - References, Notes, Resources
  
-===== CHAPTER 7. MISE-EN-SCÈNE - The Environment =====+===== CH 7. Mise-en-scène - The Environment =====
  
 This chapter talks about the Mise-en-scène (setting the scene), in other words, some of the  aspects of gamification that are often seen as superficial, but when done right can add a sense of community to a course that can be quite useful. This includes elements such as the use of avatars, the game vocabulary, and to some extent, the use of badges. It discusses some of the pros and cons of these elements in order to provide readers with enough information so they can choose for themselves whether, and how they may want to employ these strategies. For those that decide to use them, it will provide guidance for ways to use them in the classroom. This chapter talks about the Mise-en-scène (setting the scene), in other words, some of the  aspects of gamification that are often seen as superficial, but when done right can add a sense of community to a course that can be quite useful. This includes elements such as the use of avatars, the game vocabulary, and to some extent, the use of badges. It discusses some of the pros and cons of these elements in order to provide readers with enough information so they can choose for themselves whether, and how they may want to employ these strategies. For those that decide to use them, it will provide guidance for ways to use them in the classroom.
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   - References, Notes, Resources   - References, Notes, Resources
  
-===== CHAPTER 8. REWARD STRUCTURES =====+===== CH 8. Reward Structures =====
  
 It is still the case that regardless of the assessments used within a course, ultimately, instructors must still map their own assessments onto an institutionally recognized and sometimes mandated final grade. Normally this final grade will be one of: a letter grade, a grade point average, or a percent. This chapter will examine approaches to scoring in a gamified course that can still be easily mapped onto institutionally accepted grades, while at the same time providing a great deal of flexibility.  It is still the case that regardless of the assessments used within a course, ultimately, instructors must still map their own assessments onto an institutionally recognized and sometimes mandated final grade. Normally this final grade will be one of: a letter grade, a grade point average, or a percent. This chapter will examine approaches to scoring in a gamified course that can still be easily mapped onto institutionally accepted grades, while at the same time providing a great deal of flexibility. 
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   - References, Notes, Resources   - References, Notes, Resources
  
-===== CHAPTER 9. QUESTS =====+===== CH 9. Quests =====
  
 Gamification provides an innovative approach to how learning tasks are organized and assigned. The assignments that students do in order to earn marks in many courses are often characteristic for each discipline, and it is easy for instructors to settle in to a rut where even though the details of assignments may change from year to year, the format of the assignments does not. Gamification provides an innovative approach to how learning tasks are organized and assigned. The assignments that students do in order to earn marks in many courses are often characteristic for each discipline, and it is easy for instructors to settle in to a rut where even though the details of assignments may change from year to year, the format of the assignments does not.
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   - References, Notes, Resources   - References, Notes, Resources
  
-===== CHAPTER 10. SCALE =====+===== CH 10. Scale =====
  
 Some aspects of gamification, such as how points are earned or the terminology used can be applied at either the micro- or macro- level of instruction. In other words, these techniques can be used on single lessons, small to large units, and even entire courses or programs. Some aspects of gamification, such as how points are earned or the terminology used can be applied at either the micro- or macro- level of instruction. In other words, these techniques can be used on single lessons, small to large units, and even entire courses or programs.
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   - References, Notes, Resources   - References, Notes, Resources
  
-===== CHAPTER 11. AVAILABLE TOOLS =====+===== CH 11. Available Tools =====
  
 This chapter provides an overview of some of the tools available currently to support gamification and places where one can publish or mount gamified courses. This chapter provides an overview of some of the tools available currently to support gamification and places where one can publish or mount gamified courses.
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 This section offers a number of case studies and considers some of the challenges and successes. It includes three short chapters, each of which considers a different kind of course. This section offers a number of case studies and considers some of the challenges and successes. It includes three short chapters, each of which considers a different kind of course.
  
-===== CHAPTER 12: A GRADUATE LEVEL EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY COURSE =====+===== CH 12: A Graduate Level Educational Technology Course =====
  
-===== CHAPTER 13: A 1ST YEAR INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTING COURSE =====+===== CH 13: A 1st Year Introduction To Computing Course =====
  
-===== CHAPTER 14: A 4TH YEAR GAME DESIGN COURSE =====+===== CH 14: A 4th Year Game Design Course =====
  
 ====== Part 4 - End Game ====== ====== Part 4 - End Game ======
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 The last section of the book includes the concluding chapter, as well as an extensive glossary of terms used in the book, and templates for many of the techniques described in preceding chapters, such as lesson plans, game assessments, player stat sheets, and quest logs. The last section of the book includes the concluding chapter, as well as an extensive glossary of terms used in the book, and templates for many of the techniques described in preceding chapters, such as lesson plans, game assessments, player stat sheets, and quest logs.
  
-===== CHAPTER 15: FINAL THOUGHTS =====+===== CH 15: Final Thoughts =====
  
   - What's Next?   - What's Next?